Hauber, A.B., N.K. Arden, A.F. Mohamed, F.R. Johnson, P.M. Peloso, D.J. Watson, P. Mavros, A. Gammaitoni, S.S. Sen, and S.D. Taylor. (2013). "A discrete-choice experiment of United Kingdom patients' willingness to risk adverse events for improved function and pain control in osteoarthritis." Osteoarthritis Cartilage , 21(2):289-297.


OBJECTIVE: To assess patient preferences for treatment-related benefits and risks associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the management of osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: Using a chronic-illness panel in the United Kingdom, patients 45 years or older with a self-reported diagnosis of OA were eligible to participate in the study. Patient preferences were assessed using a discrete-choice experiment that compared hypothetical treatment profiles of benefits and risks consistent with NSAID use. Benefit outcomes (ambulatory pain, resting pain, stiffness, and difficulty doing daily activities) were presented on a 0-to-100 mm scale. Risk outcomes (bleeding ulcer, stroke, and myocardial infarction [MI]) were expressed as probabilities over a fixed time period. Each patient answered 10 choice tasks comparing different treatment profiles. Preference weights were estimated using a random-parameters logit model. RESULTS: Final sample included 294 patients. Patients ranked reductions in ambulatory pain and difficulty doing daily activities (both: 6.32; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.0-7.6) as the most important benefit outcomes, followed by reductions in resting pain (2.80; 95% CI: 1.8-3.8) and stiffness (2.65; 95% CI: 0.9-4.4). Incremental changes (3%) in the risk of MI or stroke were assessed as the most important risk outcomes (10.00; 95% CI: 8.2-11.8; and 8.90; 95% CI: 7.3-10.5, respectively). CONCLUSION: Patients ranked ambulatory pain as a more important benefit than resting pain; likely due to its impact on ability to do daily activities. For a 25-mm reduction, patients were willing to accept 4 times the risk of MI in ambulatory pain versus resting pain